10
Sep
08

Curriculum Development

Notes – 9/3/2008

  • Elementary School Level
    • Depending on level, students must receive ESL-based assistance/instruction 120-300 minutes per week (24-60 minutes per day)
    • There are four paraprofessionals available to assist.
    • Elementary students will not be pulled out of the classroom, but will receive assistance/instruction in their respective classes.

  • Middle School Level
    • Depending on level, students must receive ESL-based instruction 55-275 minutes per week (11-55 minutes per day).
    • B level students should attend class daily; LI students should attend class a minimum of three days a week; HI students should attend class a minimum of two days a week; and P or AP students should attend class a minimum of once a week.

  • High School Level
    • Depending on level, students must receive ESL-based instruction 55-275 minutes per week (11-55 minutes per day).
    • B level students should attend class daily; LI students should attend class a minimum of three days a week; HI students should attend class a minimum of two days a week; and P or AP students should attend class a minimum of once a week.

  • Text Research
    • After doing some research, I came across the following texts that I would like to consider for our program:
    • From ASCD:
      • How to Video No. 33: How to Get Started with ELLs (the video we discussed) – $89 (Stock #608032S53)
      • Getting Started with English Language Learners: How Educators Can Meet the Challenge – $18.95 (Stock #106048S53)
    • I was digging around the Oakland School District Web site and found some useful resources; one they recommend is Course Crafters. After visiting their Web site, I found the following possible tools:
    • Also, I visited the TESOL Web site for other potential resources.
      • Dialogue Journal Writing With Nonnative English Speakers: An Instructional Packet for Teachers and Workshop Leaders ISBN: 0-939791-39-0 – $10.00
      • Implementing the ESL Standards for Pre-K-12 Students Through Teacher Education ISBN: 0-939791-82-X – $36.95
    • Finally, after doing some research, I picked up a student copy of New Interchange, one book in a series of instructional texts for ELLs. While I wouldn’t want it to be the center of the ESL curriculum, I think it provides excellent tools/resources for the four main skills of reading, writing, listening, and speaking.
    • SIOP
    • Shining Star/Keys to Learning (Passaic City Schools – NJ)


Notes – 9/4/2008

· UbD

    • Ch. 12 – The Big Picture: UbD as Curriculum Framework
      • How should the big picture, the “macro” curriculum, be conceived and implemented to fully reflect backward planning with an emphasis on understanding?
      • What design work at the macro level will render unit design more efficient, coherent, and effective?
        • Use backwards design to design the course syllabi and program frameworks
          • Frame courses in terms of the following:
            • Essential questions
            • Enduring understandings
            • Key knowledge/skills
            • Key performance tasks
            • Rubrics
    • Steps:
      • Program
        • Established goals (align with state standards)
        • Essential questions
        • Enduring understandings
        • Key performance tasks
        • Rubrics
      • Courses
        • Established goals (align with state standards)
        • Essential questions
        • Enduring understandings
        • Key performance tasks
        • Rubrics
      • Units
        • Established goals (align with state standards)
        • Essential questions
        • Enduring understandings
        • Key performance tasks
        • Rubrics
      • Lessons
        • Established goals (align with state standards)
        • Essential questions
        • Enduring understandings
        • Key performance tasks
        • Rubrics


Michigan English Language Proficiency K-12 Standards

“The ultimate goal for all English language arts learners is personal, social, occupational, and civic literacy….English language arts education in Michigan incorporates the teaching and learning of reading, writing, speaking, listening, and viewing. Integration of English language arts occurs in multiple ways. First, English language arts curriculum, instruction, and assessment reflect the integration of listening, speaking, viewing, reading, and writing. The English language arts are not perceived as individual content areas, but as one unified subject in which each of the five areas supports the others and enhances thinking and learning. Secondly, there is integration of the teaching and learning of content and process within the English language arts. The common human experiences and the ideas, conflicts, and themes embodied in literature and all oral, written, and visual texts provide a context for the teaching of the processes, skills, and strategies of listening, speaking, viewing, reading, and writing. Finally, literacy educators believe that the knowledge, skills, and strategies of the English language arts are integrated throughout the curriculum, enabling students to solve problems and think critically and creatively in all subject areas.” (Michigan Curriculum Framework English Language Arts, pp. 3-4)

· To sum this up:

1. Personal, social, occupational, and civic literacy

2. Incorporation and integration of reading, writing, speaking, listening, and viewing, which support each other and enhance thinking and learning

3. Integration of content and process within the English language arts—in other words, using the study of a variety of texts to develop the processes, skills and strategies in of listening, speaking, viewing, reading, and writing. Therefore, not only are students learning the content embodied in these texts, but they are also using these texts as tools—or “workouts” to grow in their processes, skills and strategies as learners—as critical thinkers.

4. Develop problem solving skills, critical thinking, and creativity in all subject areas.

· Based on these four central goals within the Michigan Curriculum Framework for ELA, the purpose of an ESL classroom is to develop the same skills—but at an earlier level in language acquisition…it’s as though the general ELA classroom contains students at an advanced stage of language development and use…

· “Context for ELP Standards”

1. “To realize their personal, social, and long-term career goals, individuals will need to be able to communicate with others skillfully, appropriately, and effectively” (5).

§ This goal is applicable for all students; how is reframed in light of students whose L1 is not English? It’s not as though the goal is any different for ELLs, but it must be thought of differently.

· The Michigan English Language Proficiency Standards have been informed by the TESOL ESL Standards for Pre~K-12 Students and the work other national standards groups, particularly by English language arts and foreign language standards. The groups share an emphasis on the importance of:

1. language as communication

2. language learning through meaningful and significant use

3. the individual and societal value of bilingualism and multilingualism

4. the role of ESL students’ native languages in their English language and general academic development

5. cultural, social, and cognitive processes in language and academic development

6. assessment that respects language and cultural diversity


I. PAE English as a Second Language Program Design

Established Goals (align with state standards)

· Acquire personal, social, occupational, and civic English literacy

· Incorporate and integrate reading, writing, speaking, listening, and viewing skills using the English language

· Introduce and integrate content-area vocabulary and concepts as well as language learning process skills in core-area classes

Essential Questions

· What do I need to know in order to be proficient in the English language for personal, academic, and social settings?

· How can I express myself and share the same information with others in English?

· How can I develop my understanding of the nature of languages?

· How can I develop my understanding and appreciation of the American world?

· How is our understanding of culture and society constructed through and by language?

Enduring Understandings: Students will understand that…

· English language proficiency in will make them successful in personal, social, occupational, and social settings.

· As the world moves towards a global community, it is increasingly important to be able to communicate in English.

· It is important to understand the perspectives of a culture that generate its patterns of behavior, ways of life, worldviews, and contributions.

· Proficiency in a foreign language is a vehicle to gaining knowledge that can only be acquired through that language and its culture.

· The study of a second language enables students to develop insights into the nature of language and culture.

Key knowledge/skills

· See Michigan English Language Proficiency Standards (p. 9).

Assessment/Rubrics

· See Michigan English Language Proficiency Standards.

Sequence of Learning Experiences

· Secondary level

1. Two courses based on proficiency level of ELL students at both the high school and junior high levels:

§ Basic

§ Low Intermediate

2. Pull-out assistance for ELL students at the following levels on an as-needed basis:

§ High Intermediate

§ Proficient

3. Ongoing monitoring and evaluation of FLEP students (Advanced Proficient level)

Note for the 2008-2009 school year: Since this is the beginning of the program, it may be the case that there are only two course levels at both the middle and high school level: Basic and Low Intermediate. In the future, it may be ideal to develop a series of courses that allow the student to progress in courses that align with their proficiency level and development through all four levels.

· Elementary level

1. For the elementary level, the standards align with the Michigan ELA standards; therefore, addressing the needs of our elementary students can be met in three ways:

§ By classroom teachers meeting the ELA/ELP standards in their daily lessons;

§ By paraprofessionals, particularly bilingual paraprofessionals working with elementary level ELLs for 24-60 minutes daily based on the students ELPA designation (therefore meeting the district criteria); and

§ By the ESL teacher monitoring and evaluating the students progress on a weekly to biweekly basis through observation as well as informal and formal assessment.


II. Course Designs

Basic-Level Course A: Starting Out

Course Understandings

Course Essential Questions

Course Skills

Students will understand

· How they define themselves is a reflection of their native language and culture as well as their new identity as Americans.

· It is important to understand the American school system, policies, routines, and expectations in order to be a successful student.

· Food is a reflection of a society and culture.

·

Introduction: Who am I?

School: Who is a successful American student?

Food/Health: What does food tell us about a specific culture/country?

Daily Routines/Pastimes: What does it mean to be a young adult in various countries?

Family/Home: How do the concepts of family and home vary by country and culture?

Shopping/Media: How does the country in which we live affect our view of luxuries versus necessities?

Conclusion: How is my worldview shaped by language?

L.1.1.a. Demonstrate understanding through non-verbal gestures or with single words or learned phrases.

L.1.1.b. Follow simple two-step oral directions to complete a task in English.

L.1.1.c. Interpret gestures and visual cues used in instruction.

L.1.1.d. Perform basic classroom tasks when prompted.

L.2.1.a. Understand highly contextualized simple speech with frequent repetition and rephrasing.

L.2.1.b. Understand basic language such as greetings, leave-taking, questions, and directions.

L.3.1.a. Use active listening comprehension in a variety of situations such as following directions, responding to requests, and listening for specific purposes.

g


Basic-Level Course B: School Readiness

Course Understandings

Course Essential Questions

Course Skills

Students will understand that…

· They can use the English language to describe who they are to others.

· There is a particular system and structure to the school that may be similar or different to the school system in their native country and culture.

· Math is a universal language.

·

Introduction: What does success mean?

Education: How is education similar/different in American culture to/from my native culture? How is education valued in different the United States versus my native country?

English: How does the English language work exactly?

Math: If math is a universal language, how do I understand it in English?

Science: How do I describe our world in English?

History: How does the history of a country shape that country today?

Government: How does the American government function?

Writing: Who am I as a writer?

Conclusion: Where do I go from here?

Key knowledge/skills; Assessment/Rubrics; Sequence of Learning Experiences


Questions

· Who are my students? How many students are there at each level?

· Do we have any FLEP students? If so, how are they being monitored?

· Who is my contact person for the Child CARE Team?

· Where can I access the student folders/CA-60s?

· What courses will we have?

· What are our essential questions?

1. How can English language proficiency make me successful?

2. What do I need to know in order to be literate in English in personal, social, occupational, and civic settings?

3. How can I express myself and share the same information with others in English?

4. How can I develop my understanding of the nature of languages?

5. How can I develop my understanding and appreciation of the American world?

6. How is our understanding of culture and society constructed through and by language?

7. How can language be powerful?

8. How can you use language to empower yourself?

9. How is language used to manipulate us?

10. In what ways are language and power inseparable?

11. Is it possible to have culture without language?

12. Is it possible to think without language?

13. How does language influence the way we think, act, and perceive the world?

14. How do authors use the resources of language to impact an audience?

Think About

· How will I stay in consistent contact with the content-area teachers of my students? It will be useful to know the weekly plans and objectives in their classes so I can use this to guide my instruction.

· How will the paraprofessionals help in the content-area classes?

· PD for all staff: show video; discuss backgrounds of students; discuss protocol for receiving assistance in specific content areas.

· How can I allot my time for monitoring and evaluating 50-60 elementary school students? How will I track and assess their progress?

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